Paranoia and Pop Tarts, but you know how we roll

Posts tagged glbtq

133 notes

The Distress of the Privileged

amydentata:

In a memorable scene from the 1998 film Pleasantville (in which two 1998 teen-agers are transported into the black-and-white world of a 1950s TV show), the father of the TV-perfect Parker family returns from work and says the magic words “Honey, I’m home!”, expecting them to conjure up a smiling wife, adorable children, and dinner on the table.

This time, though, it doesn’t work. No wife, no kids, no food. Confused, he repeats the invocation, as if he must have said it wrong. After searching the house, he wanders out into the rain and plaintively questions this strangely malfunctioning Universe: “Where’s my dinner?”

Privileged distress. I’m not bringing this up just to discuss old movies. As the culture evolves, people who benefitted from the old ways invariably see themselves as victims of change. The world used to fit them like a glove, but it no longer does. Increasingly, they find themselves in unfamiliar situations that feel unfair or even unsafe. Their concerns used to take center stage, but now they must compete with the formerly invisible concerns of others.

(read more)

(via bubonickitten)

Filed under privilege glbtq consciousness-raising

4,012 notes

Romney to LGBT people: "I didn't know you had families."

creasepieces:

Boston Spirit magazine has dug a bit deeper into Mitt Romney’s past interactions with LGBT people, particularly during his time as governor. Many of these stories are known: his firing of two state employees ostensibly for marrying their same-sex partners, his dissolution of the Governor’s Commission on Gay and Lesbian Youth,  his blocking of an anti-bullying guide because it contained the words “bisexual” and “transgender,” and his testimony against marriage equality to the Senate Judiciary Committee after the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled the state’s ban was unconstitutional. But this new profile illustrates a more profound level of insensitivity to the experience of LGBT people than his past position statements suggest.

David Wilson and Julie Goodridge, two of the plaintiffs whose case led to the legalization of marriage equality in Massachusetts, described meeting with Romney to discuss their experiences. According to Wilson, “it was like talking to a robot. No expression, no feeling.” At one point, Romney remarked, “I didn’t know you had families.” Goodridge recalls her final exchange with the governor, which proved to her that he had “no capacity for empathy”:

GOODRIDGE: Governor Romney, tell me — what would you suggest I say to my 8 year-old daughter about why her mommy and her ma can’t get married because you, the governor of her state, are going to block our marriage?

ROMNEY: I don’t really care what you tell your adopted daughter. Why don’t you just tell her the same thing you’ve been telling her the last eight years.

Romney described the meeting to the press as “pleasant,” as Goodridge cried.

This lack of understanding for the experience of same-sex families seems to have played out even on the occasions in which he was open to supporting LGBT protections. Josh Friedes, who once served as advocacy director for the Massachusetts Freedom to Marry Coalition, explained Romney’s business-informed rationale:

FRIEDES: He made clear that he was willing to listen to business leaders about the issue of family recognition. The impression was that if business leaders told him certain benefits and protections would increase the productivity of gay workers, he would be open to supporting those. … It was not really about what these protections would do for gay families, but what they would do for the titans of industry… It felt like there was a lord/serf relationship.

Ardith Wieworka knows she cannot prove that she was fired as the state’s Office of Child Care Services just because she was going to marry her same-sex partner, but she remembers what Romney’s administration told her when they fired her: they wanted someone more “like them.”

Okay I try to not put politics on my blog, but what an absolute shithead.

He really sucks at this.

(Source: ubsnetworks, via markdoesstuff)

Filed under politics glbtq rights

4,505 notes

thecountessofclockwise:

saathi1013:

leighway:

christineleem:

Bi Social Network is delighted to announce Alan Cumming has signed on our imagery series for the “I am Visible’ Campaign, to help fight biphobia and bi-erasure and to showcase and support visibility in the bi community. READ MORE

#it really annoys me that people forget that he’s bisexual like they get to decide he’s gay because he has a male partner #the same way people decided amber heard is a lesbian when all indications from her interviews point to bi/pan

Bisexual hero, right there, folks.  Also: he just keeps getting more attractive, doesn’t he?

Yes, he does.

thecountessofclockwise:

saathi1013:

leighway:

christineleem:

Bi Social Network is delighted to announce Alan Cumming has signed on our imagery series for the “I am Visible’ Campaign, to help fight biphobia and bi-erasure and to showcase and support visibility in the bi community. READ MORE

#it really annoys me that people forget that he’s bisexual like they get to decide he’s gay because he has a male partner #the same way people decided amber heard is a lesbian when all indications from her interviews point to bi/pan

Bisexual hero, right there, folks.  Also: he just keeps getting more attractive, doesn’t he?

Yes, he does.

(via ro-s-a-spark-s)

Filed under visibility bi erasure bisexuality glbtq

421 notes

This was a very, very important task. Just the title is a fundamental change — you do not see Gender Identity Disorder…
We’ve made a clear statement that gender nonconformity is not pathological.

We’ve set a whole different tone. It’s more about what the professionals have to do” and not about transgender people having to prove their health needs to the professionals, he explained.

Eli Coleman, chair of the WPATH revision committee, which just released Version 7 of the Standards of Care, which has long needed an update.

THIS IS A BIG DEAL.

Some key revisions:

• Psychotherapy is no longer a requirement to receive hormones and surgery, although it is suggested.

“It used to be a minimum amount of psychotherapy was needed. An assessment is still required but that can be done by the prescribing hormone provider,” Bockting explained.

• A number of community health centers in the U.S. have developed protocols for providing hormone therapy based an approach known as the Informed Consent Model. These protocols are consistent with version 7 revisions of WPATH’s standards of care. 

“The SOC are flexible clinical guidelines; they allow for tailoring of interventions to the needs of the individual receiving services and for tailoring of protocols to the approach and setting in which these services are provided,” Coleman explained.

“Access is more open and acknowledges transgender care is being provided in community health centers. This certainly makes it easier to access hormones,” Bockting added.

• There are now different standards for surgery, as well. For example, a transgender man who wants a hysterectomy no longer has to live one year as a male in order to receive the surgery. Likewise, a transgender woman who wants her testicles removed does not have to live one year as a female. 

For people who want genital reconstructive surgery, however, the standards of care recommend living a year in the role of the gender they are transitioning. 

• Another major change, Bockting explained, is that the standards “allow for a broader spectrum of identities – they are no longer so binary.”

“There is no one way of being transgender and it doesn’t have to mirror the idea of a change of their sex,” Bockting explained.

“These standards allow for a gender queer person to have breasts removed without ever taking hormones,” he said.

The WPATH conference in Atlanta, along with the Southern Comfort Conference and the conference of the Gay & Lesbian Medical Association, was a joint effort to show the world what is being done in the area of LGBT health.

But, Bockting added, the new WPATH standards of care also show the tremendous effort that transgender people themselves are doing to ensure their access to healthcare.

“Oftentimes the standards of care were perceived as a barrier even though they were meant as access to care for hormone therapy and surgery,” he said.

“The new standards showcase the important role [transsexual, transgender, and gender nonconforming people] have played in changing the landscape of transgender health in the U.S.,” Bockting added.

Read More: WPATH announces new standards of care for transgender and gender nonconforming people

(via xxboy)

(via obsessionfull)

Filed under trans glbtq

748 notes

stfuconservatives:

pantslessprogressive:

Asshole Crowd Moment of the Night: A gay soldier proposed a question regarding the repeal of DADT: ”Do you intend to circumvent the progress that has been made” on allowing lesbian and gay individuals to serve in the military? Members of the crowd booed the soldier.
Rick Santorum responded to the question, saying, “We would reinstitute that policy if Rick Santorum was president. Period.”

This is why Santorum really earned the other definition of his name.
-Joe

You would think that seeing good people who are gay would make people realize that gay is okay, but nope. The ickiness of gay trumps all.

stfuconservatives:

pantslessprogressive:

Asshole Crowd Moment of the Night: A gay soldier proposed a question regarding the repeal of DADT: ”Do you intend to circumvent the progress that has been made” on allowing lesbian and gay individuals to serve in the military? Members of the crowd booed the soldier.

Rick Santorum responded to the question, saying, “We would reinstitute that policy if Rick Santorum was president. Period.”

This is why Santorum really earned the other definition of his name.

-Joe

You would think that seeing good people who are gay would make people realize that gay is okay, but nope. The ickiness of gay trumps all.

(Source: pantslessprogressive, via stfuconservatives)

Filed under assholes dadt gop debates glbtq

116 notes

North Carolina Lawmaker: ‘We Need To Reach Out To Gays, Get Them To Change Their Lifestyle’

robot-heart-politics:

stfuhypocrisy:

Five North Carolina state lawmakers held a town hall Thursday night to discuss the pending constitutional amendments the legislature is scheduled to take-up next week, including one measure to outlaw same-sex marriage. A majority of North Carolinians say they oppose changing the constitution but that didn’t stop state Sen. James Forrester (R) — who is also a medical doctor — from describing homosexuality as an “unhealthy lifestyle” and urging gay people to “change their lifestyle” back “to the normal lifestyle we can accept“:

FORRESTER: I’ve got a few homosexual patients and I treat them just the same as anybody else. I love them perhaps even more because I know they are going to die at least 20 years earlier and it’s something I have no control over and we need to reach out to them to try to get them to change their lifestyle and back to the normal lifestyle which we can accept.

Watch it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYR34iTtb20&feature=player_embedded

He added that the gay “lifestyle” is decreased by at least 20 years and predicted that “If this bill does not pass then homosexuality will be taught into public school as the norm.” “Do you want that? No. The homosexuals want to have their lifestyle considered normal,” Forrester said.

The amendment would have to pass both the House and the Senate by a three-fifth majority and would then go before voters on the November 2012 ballot. A 1996 state law already outlaws same-sex marriage, but supporters of the measure argue that a constitutional amendment would prevent judges from overturning it and instituting marriage equality.

Why, exactly, are gay people going to die 20 years earlier?

(Source: stfueverything, via )

Filed under glbtq north carolina james forrester heterosexism