Paranoia and Pop Tarts, but you know how we roll

Posts tagged trans

3,315 notes

TRANS COUCHSURFING NETWORK - PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THE HELL OUT OF THIS

ackb:

kelsium:

shutupandbuckleup:transcouchnetwork:

Hi! I just started a tumblr, the Transgender Couchsurfing Network.  After seeing dozens of posts come across my dash about displaced or homeless trans people needing places to crash, I decided that there had to be a way to organize these posts somehow, and to put those in need in contact with those willing to lend a hand.  If you’re trans and need a place to stay, or if you have a couch or floor or spare bedroom available for someone in need, I urge you to reblog this post, follow the blog, and get the word out.  Everything is still under heavy construction, but the more people that see and hear about this blog, the more people will be able to benefit from it!  I know that there are so many people here on tumblr who are in need of a place to stay for a night or two, and I also know how many amazing, wonderful people would be willing to host someone and help out a trans person in need.  We all know what a huge problem unemployment and homelessness are for trans people (especially TPOC and trans women) — even a place to stay for a night can make the biggest difference!  So PLEASE, even if you can’t offer up your couch, REBLOG AND SIGNAL BOOST.  I really, really think that this is something that could help a lot of people, and I would LOVE to see this spammed all over my dash and the dashes of all of my lovely followers!!

The link doesn’t seem to exist, anyone know what’s up?

It appears to be transhousingnetwork now.

Signal boost! (with new link)

(via msenjoli)

Filed under resources trans

379 notes

70 Percent of Anti-LGBT Murder Victims Are People of Color

notyourkinddear:

shnelson46:

“The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs released its annual report on hate violence motivated by sexual orientation, gender identity and expression and HIV status last week. The report documents 27 anti-LGBT murders in 2010, which is the second highest annual total recorded since 1996. 70 percent of these 27 victims were people of color; 44 percent of them were transgender women.

The study also found that transgender people and people of color are each twice as likely to experience violence or discrimination as non-transgender white people. Transgender people of color are also almost 2.5 times as likely to experience discrimination as their white peers.”

“But why do you make everything about race?” I hear you say…

(via thecuntmentality)

Filed under lgbtq trans race statistics

421 notes

This was a very, very important task. Just the title is a fundamental change — you do not see Gender Identity Disorder…
We’ve made a clear statement that gender nonconformity is not pathological.

We’ve set a whole different tone. It’s more about what the professionals have to do” and not about transgender people having to prove their health needs to the professionals, he explained.

Eli Coleman, chair of the WPATH revision committee, which just released Version 7 of the Standards of Care, which has long needed an update.

THIS IS A BIG DEAL.

Some key revisions:

• Psychotherapy is no longer a requirement to receive hormones and surgery, although it is suggested.

“It used to be a minimum amount of psychotherapy was needed. An assessment is still required but that can be done by the prescribing hormone provider,” Bockting explained.

• A number of community health centers in the U.S. have developed protocols for providing hormone therapy based an approach known as the Informed Consent Model. These protocols are consistent with version 7 revisions of WPATH’s standards of care. 

“The SOC are flexible clinical guidelines; they allow for tailoring of interventions to the needs of the individual receiving services and for tailoring of protocols to the approach and setting in which these services are provided,” Coleman explained.

“Access is more open and acknowledges transgender care is being provided in community health centers. This certainly makes it easier to access hormones,” Bockting added.

• There are now different standards for surgery, as well. For example, a transgender man who wants a hysterectomy no longer has to live one year as a male in order to receive the surgery. Likewise, a transgender woman who wants her testicles removed does not have to live one year as a female. 

For people who want genital reconstructive surgery, however, the standards of care recommend living a year in the role of the gender they are transitioning. 

• Another major change, Bockting explained, is that the standards “allow for a broader spectrum of identities – they are no longer so binary.”

“There is no one way of being transgender and it doesn’t have to mirror the idea of a change of their sex,” Bockting explained.

“These standards allow for a gender queer person to have breasts removed without ever taking hormones,” he said.

The WPATH conference in Atlanta, along with the Southern Comfort Conference and the conference of the Gay & Lesbian Medical Association, was a joint effort to show the world what is being done in the area of LGBT health.

But, Bockting added, the new WPATH standards of care also show the tremendous effort that transgender people themselves are doing to ensure their access to healthcare.

“Oftentimes the standards of care were perceived as a barrier even though they were meant as access to care for hormone therapy and surgery,” he said.

“The new standards showcase the important role [transsexual, transgender, and gender nonconforming people] have played in changing the landscape of transgender health in the U.S.,” Bockting added.

Read More: WPATH announces new standards of care for transgender and gender nonconforming people

(via xxboy)

(via obsessionfull)

Filed under trans glbtq

946 notes

I don’t really think that a welcome is enough, to be frank.

Feminism has a long long long history of cissexism and transphobia. Cissupremacy was at one point central to feminism. Second-wave feminists like Mary Daly, Andrea Dworkin, and yes, even Gloria Stienem (though she’s gotten better I believe) actively worked to exclude trans women from woman-only spaces - which meant life or death when you’re talking about rape crisis and domestic violence survivor shelters. Trans women, who face a MUCH higher rate of gendered violence than cis women

This legacy has created a cis-centric feminism in which trans women are dehumanized and excluded to this very day and in which cis women like me participate. Trans women still face extremely high rates of violence, and like all marginalized women their safety is still not considered a priority the way, say, abortion is.

We should not expect trans women to just join us because we waved and asked nicely, to trust a group that has contributed to violence against them, because we finally acknowledged that they are women. We’ve got to do more than just welcome women in, than deign to finally do something we should have been doing all along (I don’t think this is totally SHIC’s point of view, btw - she may share these views, it just got me thinking).

Cis feminists need to do more than just welcome. We need to repair feminism: to centralize trans women on a consistent basis, to take their violence and degradation as seriously as we do our own.

rachel mccarthy james, emphasis pronoun (via transfeminism, sluthaditcoming) (via hairyqueerkid) (via combat—wombat) (via sexgenderbody) (via locomotives) (via whatfreshhellisthis) (via iamwhoiamandidontgiveadamn)

Relevant to recent postings.

(via nines19)

Filed under trans feminism cissexism

132 notes

sexxxisbeautiful:

sexualassumptions:

tristantaormino:

I feel so overwhelmed with gratitude at the amazing people who’ve endorsed Take Me There. Wow, just wow.
“Take Me There is a smokin’ hot sampling of sassy smart smut that  took me where I’d never been before in print—this is the most  gender-diverse erotica collection I’ve ever seen anywhere.”—Susan Stryker, Ph.D. Director, Institute for LGBT Studies, University of Arizona“Finally,  a book that has something for everyone whose gender and sexual  fantasies don’t fit into the usual boxes. I loved it. WOOF!!”—Buck Angel® Pioneering Filmmaker, Educator, and Advocate“As  someone who is androgynous-identified, it feels positively monumental  to hold in my hands an erotica anthology where trans* desire is not the  token, but the topic! In making our desires visible—within our own  communities and beyond—our gender expressions, our fantasies, our  very lives are made real. Take Me There brings us HERE.”—Jiz Lee, GenderQueer Porn Star“There  are multiple theories of desire out there; many histories of sexuality;  lots of studies of sexual practices, but, until now, there were few  accounts, fictional or otherwise of the multiple ways that queer people  eroticize gender variant bodies. This collection is hot and steamy,  boiling with new lust, bubbling with new languages of desire, new ways  of naming the body, different modes of telling each other “I want you.”  Ask what you need from this book, it will take you there. I promise.”—Jack Halberstam, author of Female Masculinity
“Finally,  a satisfying resource that more of us can offer, with a sly smile, when  they ask us what exactly we *do* with one another.”—Scott Turner Schofield, author of Two Truths and a Lie

Pleasure-positivity is the epitome of inclusive… We need to support these folks!

added to my wishlist!

sexxxisbeautiful:

sexualassumptions:

tristantaormino:

I feel so overwhelmed with gratitude at the amazing people who’ve endorsed Take Me There. Wow, just wow.

Take Me There is a smokin’ hot sampling of sassy smart smut that took me where I’d never been before in print—this is the most gender-diverse erotica collection I’ve ever seen anywhere.”
—Susan Stryker, Ph.D. Director, Institute for LGBT Studies, University of Arizona

“Finally, a book that has something for everyone whose gender and sexual fantasies don’t fit into the usual boxes. I loved it. WOOF!!”
Buck Angel® Pioneering Filmmaker, Educator, and Advocate

“As someone who is androgynous-identified, it feels positively monumental to hold in my hands an erotica anthology where trans* desire is not the token, but the topic! In making our desires visible—within our own communities and beyond—our gender expressions, our fantasies, our very lives are made real. Take Me There brings us HERE.”
Jiz Lee, GenderQueer Porn Star

“There are multiple theories of desire out there; many histories of sexuality; lots of studies of sexual practices, but, until now, there were few accounts, fictional or otherwise of the multiple ways that queer people eroticize gender variant bodies. This collection is hot and steamy, boiling with new lust, bubbling with new languages of desire, new ways of naming the body, different modes of telling each other “I want you.” Ask what you need from this book, it will take you there. I promise.”
—Jack Halberstam, author of Female Masculinity

“Finally, a satisfying resource that more of us can offer, with a sly smile, when they ask us what exactly we *do* with one another.”
—Scott Turner Schofield, author of Two Truths and a Lie

Pleasure-positivity is the epitome of inclusive… We need to support these folks!

added to my wishlist!

Filed under erotica porn trans queer

55 notes

Fetishization Or Attraction? “Tr***y Boys Are The Hottest”

delisubthefemmecub:

Trigger Warning: Discussion of fetishization of trans* people, use of the T-word.

Anonymous asked you:

Someone I went to the trans march with said something to the effect of “tranny boys are the hottest.” I didn’t know what to say, because on one hand, it sucks to fetishize transpoeple, but on the other hand, we are a pretty attractive group of people (*preens*). so I guess my question is, where do you think attraction ends and fetishization starts?

This is a really great, important, and difficult question.  Fetishization is something I think about a lot as a trans person.  And there are even rare occasions where I have welcomed fetishization, just because it felt the tiniest better than being told that trans* people are repulsive. With that in mind, I think it’s really important that we, as individuals and as communities, are conscious of how we recognize and handle fetishization. Especially while we are simultaneously working to show people that trans* peoples and trans* bodies are not “repulsive” or “wrong.”

So how do we draw lines between what is fetishization and what is attraction? Is that always even possible? Using anon’s example of fetishizing trans* men (I assume?), I want to give an example of someone who I would personally consider to be fetishizing.

This person is not a trans* man. They may be cis, or they could trans* (For example, trans* men can fetishize trans* women and vice versa… Though I think the conversation is even more complicated then). Their one-dimensional attraction requires sweeping generalizations about what trans* men look like, how trans* men act, what trans* men desire, etc. And, to get very Freudian on y’all, this person sees trans* men as objects. If a fetishist sees a trans* man as nothing more than an in-the-flesh fulfillment of a trans* stereotype that ~so excites them~, they cannot possibly see individual trans* men as whole individuals. 

Often fetishization is paired with underlying cissexism or trans* hatred. For example, this person may think that “trans* men are the sexiest men,” while still behaving in a cissexist manner and showing little interest the actual well-being of trans* peoples and communities. 

I don’t think that fetishization is always (Or even usually) as clear cut as this. So often the lines are blurry. I think that in your personal relationships it has to be up to you and your partner/lover/friend/hook-up to decide what you are comfortable with. 

But, back to the point, how do I see your acquaintance fitting into all of this, anon? Let’s break it down!

They said: “Tranny boys are the hottest.”

So are they exhibiting underlying cissexism or trans* hatred? I would say yes. By using the T-word (As well as the infantilizing language of “boys”), this person is suggesting that they care very little about the well-being of trans* peoples. They are apparently unconcerned about using a slur to describe the objects of their affection. 

Are they basing their attractions off sweeping generalizations about trans* men?  I would say yes. How can you possible say that all trans* men are “the hottest” without having a uni-dimensional idea of what all trans* men look like? By saying this, this person is suggesting that there is something essentially ~hot~ about all trans* men, and therefore, that there is something essentially similar about all trans* men. Which, of course, there is not. And more often than not the ~hotness~ that fetishists are referring to has something to do with being FAAB or feminine. They may be into our junk, or they may think we’re just ~softer men~. Whatever the case, it’s fucked up.

I think that in our efforts to “de-mystify” trans* peoples, our communities sometimes encourage fetishization. For example, Tranny Wood Pictures distributes flyers to gay cis men outlining the “Top 5 Reasons to Fuck a Transguy.” The flyers list the following reasons:

Top Five Reasons to Fuck a Transguy*

  1. Transguys are hot!
  2. Trans cock is any shape or size you want, and it never goes soft.
  3. Three holes are better than two.
  4. Small hands make small fists.
  5. Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back.

*Every transguy is unique, so keep in mind that some many not agree with these reasons. Ask your partner about language and boundaries and always play safe. More information can be found at http://www.tm4m.org

Despite the asterisk/footnote at the end (which is quite small on the actual flyer), this flyer develops some really essentialized notions of what a trans* men are like and what they like to do in bed. The message sent is that trans* men are similar and interchangeable, they are universally hot, they pack and strap and call it a cock, they enjoy being fucked in three holes (which they apparently have), they have small hands and enjoy fisting, and they are a curiosity. 

Apparently “Because you’re attracted to a man, who is trans*, and he consents to being fucked” is not an important enough reason to make the ~Top 5~. I understand that this was an honest effort to “de-mystify” trans* men and to make gay communities more welcoming to trans* men. But ultimately, that welcoming comes at the cost of fetishization.

That in mind, how do we work towards making the world of dating, etc. easier for trans* folks… Without presenting ourselves as objects ready for consumption and fetishization?

I find myself struggling to wrap up this post, but I think thats kind of perfect. These are just my thoughts and they are unfinished, open-ended, very narrowly focused and not enough on their own.

(via formerlyaeraspais-deactivated20)

Filed under trans cissexism fetishization glbtq